Wuxi Expat Philosopher Wonders about The Moralty of Taking Off One’s Clothes

Wuxi Expat Philosopher Wudwig Littgenstein wonders about the morality of taking his clothes.

"Should I ever take off my clothes? Or should I ever put them on? Should I take my clothes off when I teach English? Should I take my clothes during the class, before the class, or after the class? These questions are something that we can’t pass over in silence. They are matters of grave import that can be decided in this life, not outside of life and existence which may not exist anyway! Should I take off my clothes before I read the Poolside Harry Moore? Should I take off my clothes in the restroom or in the bar area of the Pink Kitty Pub? The way I figure it, A property is internal if it is unthinkable that its object does not possess it. (This blue colour and that stand in the internal relation of brighter and darker eo ipso. It is unthinkable that these two objects should not stand in this relation.) (Here to the shifting use of the words “clothes” and “freesom” there corresponds the shifting use of the word “naked”.) If you look at the following chart, the truth-possibilities can be presented by schemata of the following kind (“T” means “true”, “F” “false”. The rows of T’s and F’s under the row of the elementary propositions mean their truth-possibilities in an easily intelligible symbolism).
p q r
T T T
F T T
T F T
T T F

F F T
F T F
"F F
F F F
p q
T T
F T
T F
F F
p
T
F
Therefore, I am pretty sure that it is okay to take one’s clothes in the process of changeing into other clothes, but I still haven’t finished my chart of truth-possibilities of the elementary propositions that can be made about nudity and naturism in public situations!" said Littgenstein in an exclusive interview with WCE Philosophy Quarterly.

Littgenstein who teaches English part-time at HyLote English School in Wuxi, China spends his spare time helping with the design of Archduke Harry Moore’s new townhouse in Wuxi’s Kundmanngasse. In particular, Littgenstein has focused on the windows, doors, and radiators, demanding that every detail be exactly as he has specified. With the house nearly finished, Littgenstein is demanding an entire ceiling be raised 30mm so that the room had the exact proportions he wants. Archduke Moore writes that "This is not so marginal as it may at first appear, for it is precisely these details that lend what is otherwise a rather plain, even ugly house its distinctive beauty." It has taken Littgenstein a year to design the door handles, and another to design the air conditioners. Each window is covered by a metal screen that weighs 150 kg, and is moved by a pulley Littgenstein designed. Lernhard Beitner, author of The Architecture of Wudwig Littgenstein, said there is barely anything comparable in the history of interior design: "It is as ingenious as it is expensive. A metal curtain that can be lowered into the floor."

Littgenstein’s fastidiousness has lead the philosopher to wander around the Wuxi China Expatdom muttering to himself. With a mercurial smile, he has been heard to say: "I am getting stupider and stupider each day. Maybe I should move with Duston Short or join the Obama Phone Group!"

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About wuxiandis

An English Teacher in Wuxi, China. Married to a local girl. Father of a boy born August 23, 2007.
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